FSU’s Auden Tate selected by Bengals in 7th round of 2018 NFL Draft

Levi Wallace #39 of the Alabama Crimson Tide breaks up a pass intended for Auden Tate #18 of the Florida State Seminoles during their game at Mercedes-Benz Stadium on September 2, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Scott Cunningham/Getty Images)

Auden Tate, Florida State University / 6-4.75 / 228 pounds / Wide receiver

Auden Tate was the 35th pick in the seventh round (No. 253 overall) of the 2018 NFL Draft by the Cincinnati Bengals.

Quick bio: Tate caught 65 passes for 957 yards and 16 touchdowns in two seasons at FSU. He played through a shoulder injury, missing just one of FSU’s 13 games in 2017. After a season-ending injury to FSU quarterback Deondre Francois in the opener, Tate quickly built chemistry with true freshman James Blackman and became a go-to target in the red zone for the former Glades Central star. Tate had a three-touchdown day in the bowl win over Southern Miss, helping propel his draft stock as an early entry in the 2018 NFL Draft.

Scouting report: Tate uses his size and physicality in the red zone, winning position against shorter corners and hauling in touchdowns. Of his ACC-leading 10 touchdowns in 2017, nine came from inside the 20-yard line. The knock on Tate is that he doesn’t have the speed to separate in the open field, but he tied for the team lead with 40 receptions last season. He is considered the ninth-best receiver on the board by CBSSports.com.

NFL Combine results: Tate ran a 4.68, a slow mark for a receiver. He also had a 31-inch vertical.

Quoting: “Tate provides a large strike zone for the quarterback and out-rebounds defenders, boxing out and trampling cornerbacks. However, he is still incredibly raw as a route-runner, leading defenders to his spot and not always making himself available mid-pattern. Overall, Tate will never be a dynamic separator in coverage and needs to develop the details of the position, but he is able to mismatch defensive backs with his size and body control, boasting the skill-set to make a living in the red zone.” — NFLDraftScout.com analyst Dane Brugler

Secondary is Florida State’s deepest/most talented unit

 

 

Derwin James heads a deep and talented secondary for Florida State.
Derwin James heads a deep and talented secondary for Florida State.

With 17 returning starters, Florida State has few holes to fill after losing an interior defensive lineman, two linebackers and two defensive backs.

But Jimbo Fisher has the program in a position where it’s always thinking a year (or two) ahead in its development and able to anticipate the losses, whether two players are drafted (2016) or 11 (2015).

FSU will be in the top five of most preseason polls which means the talent is not lacking. We take a look at that talent from a positional standpoint and rank those units from deepest to weakest.

1. Secondary: Even after losing the fifth overall pick in the draft (Jalen Ramsey), this position is loaded with future NFL players. We start with the most talented player on defense, sophomore Derwin James, who is garnering All-American talk after forging his way into the starting lineup as a true freshman. James showed his athletic ability after taking over at strong safety. He did make freshman mistakes in 2015, especially in games against Georgia Tech and Houston, but he is poised for a breakout season. The group will receive a big boost with the return of Trey Marshall from injury at the nickel, and safety Nate Andrews is back for a fourth year. The only big question mark is who replaces Ramsey opposite cornerback Marquez White. Tarvarus McFadden appears to have the edge. What also separates the secondary is the depth. A lot of programs would like to have talents like Calvin Brewton, Marcus Lewis, A.J. Westbrook and newcomer Levonta Taylor playing every down.

2. Defensive line: This unit shot to the top when DE DeMarcus Walker decided to forgo the draft and return for his senior season. Walker and sophomore Josh Sweat give FSU one of the top end tandems in the country. And the interior isn’t bad either with junior Derrick Nnadi returning after his first year as a starter and Demarcus Christmas ready to replace Nile Lawrence-Stample. Jacob Pugh and Fred Jones provide the primary depth but the position has been hurt by attrition and needs a few more bodies.

Cook
Cook

3. Running back: One player makes this one of the top units on the team (and in the country) but what keeps it from coming in any higher is the uncertainty behind Dalvin Cook. Cook returns after a record-breaking season and seventh place finish in the Heisman voting and the fullback spot is secure with Freddie Stevenson. But what cannot be totally discounted are the nagging injuries that limited Cook last season and what kind of production FSU will get behind Cook. Jacques Patrick showed flashes as a freshman last season and had a great game against Syracuse when Cook was held out because of an ankle injury. Still, at times he was underwhelming. Ryan Green had a solid spring but the running back turned cornerback turned running back has carried the ball six times in the last two years.

4. Receivers/tight end: The numbers – three receivers with at least 57 catches – are impressive but all agree even more was expected. They all return and the 2014 and 2015 stacked recruiting classes are a year older. The position received a huge boost in the spring with the emergence of Auden Tate. I believe he could become the big (as in 6-5) receiver FSU has lacked since Kelvin Benjamin left. Then there was the maturity and improvement Travis Rudolph showed in the spring. All it will take is one or two more of the young players to emerge to go along with veterans Rudolph, Jesus Wilson and Kermit Whitfield and they could be a dynamite group. As for tight end, Ryan Izzo proved more than capable last year and this, too, is a diverse, deep group.

5. Offensive line: Perhaps the biggest mystery on the team. At times the line was solid last season and at times it looked lost. No question the talent is there and, in fact, some of that talent is in the extraordinary depth this group possesses with 20 offensive linemen on scholarship. But beyond LT Rod Johnson (an All-American candidate and projected first round pick in early mock drafts) a lot has to come together. Coaches are confident LG Kareem Are, C Alec Eberle, RG Wilson Bell and RT Brock Ruble will jell. And the likelihood is they do. But I still need to see it. More than any other position, I believe the offensive line will determine whether Florida State is a true title contender this year.

Maguire
Maguire

6. Quarterback: Two years of Jameis Winston seems so far removed. This position remains somewhat of a mystery – and as always will be scrutinized more than any other during camp – for two reasons: The known (senior Sean Maguire) and the unknown (freshman Deondre Francois). Maguire is capable. He was solid, not spectacular after Everett Golson imploded last year and he does deserve a break for his Peach Bowl performance after playing more than two quarters on a broken ankle. But can he lead FSU to the ACC title and playoffs? That answer varies depending on who you are asking. Francois has all the potential and tools but he has yet to take a snap in a college game. Obviously, this position is hugely important and it could turn out to be a strength or a weakness.

7. Linebackers: The Seminoles lost both their starters, although neither was drafted, but still are confident that juniors Ro’Derrick Hoskins and Matthew Thomas will seamlessly step in. Hoskins is more certain after being a key contributor last year with Reggie Northrup limited early from offseason knee surgery and Terrance Smith missing four games later because of an ankle injury. Thomas is not as reliable only because of a checkered history that last limited him to 12 games since signing in 2013 because of suspensions. The position has had depth issues in the past but coaches hope Josh Brown and Sh’Mar Kilby-Lane will solve that this season.

[RELATED: Cook, Johnson, Walker on future NFL stars list]

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[RELATED: FSU strength of schedule pulls in another top 10 rating]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Florida State’s Auden Tate brings smiles to faces on Mother’s Day

 

Auden Tate spent part of his Mother's Day at a nursing home in Tampa.
Auden Tate spent part of his Mother’s Day at a nursing home in Tampa.

Auden Tate decided he would make a lot of mom’s happy on Mother’s Day.

The Florida State wide receiver visited a nursing home in Tampa to spend part of his day with moms “whose families didn’t.”

Tate brought a lot of smiles to the faces of all the moms while shaking hands and posing for pictures.

 

 

Tate, a rising sophomore, played at Wharton High in Tampa. He had a breakout spring and was the star of the spring game with six catches for 100 yards and two TDs. The 6-5, 281-pound Tate will add much needed size to the wide receiver position this season.

Coach Jimbo Fisher said Tate, with “that big body and those big hands can be a “weapon” for the Seminoles’ offense but he needs to add more polish, especially on his routes.

Tate gesture came a day after Florida State was in the news for the wrong reasons when running back Mario Pender was dismissed from the team after being arrested and booked on charges of committing violence by strangulation and resisting an officer without violence.

[RELATED:  FSU coaches liked Greg Bryant as a player, person]

[RELATED: FSU’s Mario Pender dismissed from team after arrest] 

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Florida State: Five things we learned from the spring game

 

Deondre Francois threw for 246 yards and 2 TDs in the spring game.
Redshirt freshman Deondre Francois threw for 246 yards, 2 TDs in the Florida State spring game.

ORLANDO – As far as spring game goes, Florida State’s was as about as good at it gets.

The Garnet and Gold teams each scored on their final two drives and the game ended 24-24. Jimbo Fisher was very pleased with the spring finale, a stark contrast from the way spring started when Fisher ripped into his team what he called the worst practice any of his teams had since he became a head coach.

The Seminoles had plenty of breakout performances but here is what we learned.

QB Sean Maguire will be pushed to keep his starting job

Henry
Malik Henry

Maguire, the senior who is recovering from surgery on his ankle, watched FSU’s freshmen quarterbacks close the gap on the competition. Redshirt Deondre Francois and early enrollee Malik Henry dueled to the end, each leading their teams on two scoring drives in the final five minutes. Francois was 20 of 33 for 246 yards and two interceptions. Henry was 15 of 22 for 205 yards and a slow start in which his Garnet team did not have a first down in the first half. Both tossed two TD passes. “Sean will be right there and he’ll go back up to No. 1 and they’ll all compete for it,” Fisher said. “They’re all going to compete for it in fall camp. I’m anxious to what we can put in that mix the better.”

WR Auden Tate is for real

One of the biggest disappointments last season was that none of the receivers behind Travis Rudolph, Kermit Whitfield and Jesus Wilson emerged. Well, now there is a fourth member of the top tier, 6-5 Tate, who had six catches for 100 yards and two TDs. The most impressive was a play in which he ran the wrong route, but kept moving, headed down the sideline and leaped to catch the throw from Francois, giving the Gold a 21-17 lead. The catch was pure Kelvin Benjamin, who by the way is the player to whom Tate is drawing the most comparisons. “Auden made a phenomenal catch,” Fisher said. “The play itself was phenomenal. That was a great play. But you saw his body size, you see what he has a chance to be and he’s got to get better. He’ll keep polishing those routes but that big body and those hands, he can be a weapon for us.”

Derwin James is an All-American in the making

James, the strong safety, made a name for himself last season making several freshman All-American teams and even being touted by some as the best freshman in the country. Now he has taken the next step this spring not only on the field but as a leader. James was all over the field on Saturday. But as much as his physical ability, Fisher continues to praise James for the way he has taken hold of the leadership role. “He just gets it,” Fisher said. “The physical skills are crazy, he’s unbelievably instinctive but he’s an intelligent guy, a very intelligent person, not just football player. And then he’s a great people person. Derwin’s a fun guy to be a round. Guys just flock to him. He has that charisma.”

Ryan Green is back where he belongs

Ryan Green
Ryan Green

The rising junior made the switch back to running back after spending a season at cornerback and looks as though he never left. Green gained a game-high 84 yards on 16 carries. And although the 5-11, 205-pound green appears as if he’s too small to plow through the middle and will only beat you on the edge, he showed he’s also capable to picking up the tough yards. Green and Jacques Patrick will enter camp battling for the most playing time behind Dalvin Cook. “It’s just natural,” Green said. “I know how to make people miss, I can catch out of the backfield. I run hard. I just feel like it’s the way to go.”

Ricky Aguayo ready to step into some very big shoes

Ironically, those shoes belong to his brother, Roberto, who concluded his historic career last season by joining Deion Sanders as the only two FSU players to be named to at least one All-America team three straight years. Ricky, a true freshman who enrolled early, got off to a good start as his brother’s successor by nailing both of his field goal attempts, from 45 and 46 yards, the latter coming with four seconds remaining and his team trailing by three points. Aguayo hit a low line drive that cleared the crossbar by feet. “What Ricky did at the end of the game was special,” Fisher said. “To come in in that     situation, tie the game, you never know. We could have that during the season.”

[Read the game story from the spring game here]

 

 

Big receiver Auden Tate standing out for Florida State

Auden Tate's size could big a big plus for Florida State's offense.
Florida State has not had a receiver with Auden Tate’s size contribute since Kelvin Benjamin.

Florida State has been waiting for a fourth receiver to stand out for the last year.

Now one appears to have separated himself, at least this spring.

Auden Tate, at 6-5 the tallest of the Seminoles receivers, was singled out by coach Jimbo Fisher following Saturday’s scrimmage at Doak Campbell Stadium. Tate

“Auden made a play or two,” Fisher said. “He is having a heck of a spring. He is definitely making big plays out there, making some great catches. (His size) gives him a lot of advantage because he can box a lot of guys out, making acrobatic catches and he’s got good body control.”

Adding Tate, who weighs 218 pounds, to the core lead by 6-2 Travis Rudolph and including 5-10 Jesus Wilson and 5-8 Kermit Whitfield would be significant considering his size. The Seminoles have missed that presence since 6-5 Kelvin Benjamin left for the NFL following the 2013 season.

[Top receiver in country moves Florida State in Top 10]

[FSU lands commitment from four-star QB Bailey Hockman]

[Jacques Patrick making strides in second year at FSU]

One plays says it all when describing how important it is to have a big body at receiver; the game-winning pass from Jameis Winston to Benjamin in the final seconds of the championship game.

“It gives him a lot of advantages,” Rudolph said about Tate’s size. “He can box a lot of guys out and make acrobatic catches. He has good body control.”

Tate, a rising sophomore, is taking advantage of his opportunities in a spring where several of the young receivers have missed time or been limited, including Da’Vante Phillips, George Campbell, Nyqwan Murray and Ja’Vonn Harrison.

Rudolph, Wilson and Whitfield all surpassed 50 receptions last season. Harrison, Murray and Ermon Lane each had six catches. Tate played in six games and did not have a catch.